Energy decarbonisation

The Revision of the Energy Taxation Directive and its Impact on the Romanian Energy Sector

The current version of the Energy Taxation Directive (ETD) is deemed outdated and misaligned with the EU agenda of promoting renewable energy sources, energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) reduction. The European Commission’s ETD proposal is a unique opportunity to address some of the missing pieces of the current framework and sets the ground for encouraging the roll out of new, sustainable technologies and products by: building the tax rates based on the energy content and environmental impact, widening the taxation base, by including energy sectors that are not in the scope of the current ETD (aviation, shipping), developing mechanisms to incentivize new energy carriers and technologies, such as hydrogen and storage.

Renewable energy directive revision impact on the Romanian energy sector

The current Renewable Energy Directive (RED II) is being amended, as part of a broader overhaul of EU climate and energy legislation, to update the target and the legislation for delivering at least a 55% reduction in GHG emissions by 2030. The European Commission’s RED revision is the key EU legislative instrument for promoting the uptake of renewable energy sources and lays the foundation for higher RES targets at EU level and in every member state, mainstreaming renewables in buildings, H&C, industry, and transport.

Clean Hydrogen in Romania – elements of a strategy

Decarbonising the EU economy will most of all require direct electrification of over 60% of end-uses, based on energy efficiency considerations. However, this will not always be technically possible or cost-efficient. Decarbonised molecules, such as hydrogen, will also contribute to eliminating ‘stubborn emissions’ in hard-to-abate sectors such as high-temperature heat and feedstock in industry, aviation and long-haul shipping, and possibly large-scale district heating and long-term electricity storage, thus increasing the flexibility and resilience of the energy system.

Carbon capture and storage – the Gordian knot of decarbonization in Central and Eastern Europe

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) refers to a chain of technologies deployed to capture, transport and store CO2 away from the atmosphere, mitigating its warming effect on the climate. For each step in the CCS process, a range of technologies has been developed and tested for different industries and operating conditions, making CCS a complex value chain rather than a single, “off-the-shelf” technology as it is sometimes portrayed

Code of Good Practice for Renewable Energy in Romania

The present paper comes at a crucial time in the country’s energy transition, to applaud past successes, highlight sector specific challenges and opportunities, and bring together public and private stakeholders united by one simple mission – creating a framework that is both climate friendly and economically viable, for the generations to come.

Building momentum for the long-term CCS deployment in the CEE region – CCS4CEE

Captarea, stocarea și utilizarea dioxidului de carbon (CCUS) pot avea o contribuție importantă la decarbonarea economiei europene. Pe lângă prezența la nivel național a unor actori industriali pentru care tehnologia CCS poate reprezenta o opțiune de decarbonare, România dispune de un potențial geologic notabil pentru stocarea de CO2.

Building momentum for the long-term CCS deployment in the CEE region – CCS4CEE

Pentru a evalua dimensiunea potențială a pieței de captare și stocare a carbonului (CCS) și a celei de captare și utilizare a carbonului (CCU) din România, această secțiune oferă o vedere de ansamblu a evoluției emisiilor interne de CO2 și a surselor acestora, precum și un indiciu privind dimensiunea economică a principalelor sectoare în care CCS (și, într-o oarecare măsură, CCU) ar putea oferi soluții viabile de decarbonizare.

Building momentum for the long-term CCS deployment in the CEE region – CCS4CEE

Pentru a evalua dimensiunea potențială a pieței de captare și stocare a carbonului (CCS) și a celei de captare și utilizare a carbonului (CCU) din România, această secțiune oferă o vedere de ansamblu a evoluției emisiilor interne de CO2 și a surselor acestora, precum și un indiciu privind dimensiunea economică a principalelor sectoare în care CCS (și, într-o oarecare măsură, CCU) ar putea oferi soluții viabile de decarbonizare.

Ten Priority Areas for Romania Post COVID-19 Recovery: A Focus on Energy and Climate Policy

The post COVID-19 economic recovery represents a unique opportunity for setting Romania on a path of sustainable economic growth and for ensuring its competitiveness in a future decarbonised EU economy.

Falling behind the pack? Romania’s lack of ambition in non-ETS sectors may undermine the prospects for reaching the European Green Deal objectives

This policy brief argues that Romania’s lack of ambitiousness, especially in sectors that are not part of the Emissions Trading System, such as transport, buildings and agriculture, may both undermine the country’s ability to reach climate neutrality by 2050 and could put the Romanian economy at a comparative disadvantage compared to early movers.

Energy System Integration and the Role of Hydrogen

The sudden interest for hydrogen in Romania is lacking though a robust foundation in policy analysis and planning, having been fueled almost entirely by the momentum that the topic has received at EU and international levels.

Accelerated lignite exit in Bulgaria, Romania and Greece

All three countries can phase out lignite without implications for the security of supply, with only a few hard coal power plants remaining in the system – the study finds. The difficulties lie in job losses and an increase in end-user prices, which are both politically sensitive consequences of the phase-out.

The Impact of the COVID-19 Crisis on the European Green Deal: A Focus on Romania and Southeast Europe

The dip in carbon prices, also a result of lower energy demand, shows the adversarial impact that the coronavirus crisis can have on the European Green Deal. In Romania, a drop in energy prices threatens further investments in the sector, while potentially ill-conceived governmental interventions risk creating lasting and unforeseen imbalances

Three stereotypes of the Romanian energy establishment

“Energy markets cannot be trusted, either for affordable prices or security of supply.” Closely related, this cliché is probably the easiest to notice in policy and regulation.

The Decarbonisation Challenge of Southeast Europe: A Case Study of Romania

This paper uses Romania as a case study to illustrate the SEE situation. First, this article briefly summarises the general European context and the framework through which member states will cooperate in the area of energy policy. Second, it showcases the energy and climate strategies of Romania. Third, it turns to some of the main barriers that the country is currently facing in reforming its energy markets. The final part of the article summarises the findings, while also suggesting some avenues that may be pursued to overcome the challenges of decarbonisation in SEE.

The Governance of the Energy Union: A New Framework for Cooperation

One of the most important outcomes of this legislative act is the requirement for governments to produce Integrated National Energy and Climate Plans. These plans must elaborate on the main priorities, strategies and actions to be taken within a 10-year period, covering all the five main areas of the Energy Union (security of supply, the internal energy market, energy efficiency, decarbonisation, and research and innovation).

The Governance of the Energy Union: A New Framework for Cooperation

One of the most important outcomes of this legislative act is the requirement for governments to produce Integrated National Energy and Climate Plans. These plans must elaborate on the main priorities, strategies and actions to be taken within a 10-year period, covering all the five main areas of the Energy Union (security of supply, the internal energy market, energy efficiency, decarbonisation, and research and innovation).

The clean energy transition and the geopolitics of technology metals

Wind turbines, PV panels and hi-power batteries are pillars of the transition to clean electricity generation and low-emission transports. Confidence in their future costs reductions is paramount for both investors and policy makers. But while such investments are expected to grow massively in the coming years, constraints of a different kind will have to be kept in mind.

Renewable energy and the conundrum of the Romanian irrigation system

Some say statistics lie and this is sometimes true. However, oftentimes statistical figures are so striking that underlying facts become obvious. At the European level, the irrigation systems differ a lot by technology, but also in terms of irrigable and irrigated areas. According to 2013 data provided by Eurostat, there are important discrepancies between member states.

An analysis of the evolution of electricity prices in January 2017

Given that Romania is quickly moving towards the completion of a centralized natural gas trading market – including through the elimination, from April 2017, of the predetermined price for the internal production of natural gas – it is necessary to make use of the current mechanisms and specific regulations, and to introduce new ones, to limit the effects of possible massive price volatility caused by speculative behavior

The Gemasolar Thermosolar Plant: one step closer to energy storage of the future

Photovoltaic is a unique concept, if looked at how fast this technology has been growing. In the next decade, global demand could be significantly fueled by solar power. Today, just 0.5% of the electricity comes from photovoltaics worldwide. It may seem like a small number, but in 1998 this was 0.003% and if the trend continues, in 2028 it will grow to 50%. Therefore, by then half of the energy demand could come from solar-powered plants.

Biogas: A high-potential, sustainable, yet untapped fuel in Romania

For Romania to increase its biogas production 50-fold, a step change is necessary, even if the level of support is sufficient to make most investments profitable.

COP21, Paris: national contribution plans

COP21 (The Conference of the Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, UNFCCC) will be the event of this fall and end of the year in environmental diplomacy. The intention is to achieve a “universal and legally binding agreement” to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) in order to keep global warming below 2° C from pre-industrial levels, beyond which it is presumed that the effects are irreversible.

Romania’s energy policies, between liberalisation and environmental protection

Industrial competitiveness gains more and more traction across EU`s energy policy.
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